Vintage Spotlight: Rolex Split Second Chronograph

The trip to the Breitling boutique and a look at their vintage pieces has really gotten me on the vintage train.  As I said in my previous blog, I have never completely loved the vintage game, but I am quickly turning the corner.

I just read an article about a vintage complicated Rolex the other day that I am absolutely in love with.  Rolex does not make any super-complicated movements nowadays, so I was shocked when I saw this bad boy.

The watch was an incredibly rare Rolex split second chronograph made in 1942 that was never available to the public.  Only 12 pieces were ever made, and only eight are accounted for today.

Apparently, I am not the only one who finds the watch pretty awesome, as one of them just broke the world record for the most expensive Rolex ever to be sold at auction.  The timepiece brought in $1.16 million at Christie’s Important Watches sale in Geneva on May 16!

Back in the early 1940s, the watch was made as a gift to famous race drivers in Italy and the United Kingdom, who needed to keep track of their racing times.

I am off to Vegas for the holiday weekend for a couple of watch shows and hope to run into some more watches that I never knew about.  I will be sure to bring a camera and post them if I do.  The great thing about the watch world is that just when you think you have seen it all, you see something else that completely blows you away…

Happy holiday weekend to all!

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2 thoughts on “Vintage Spotlight: Rolex Split Second Chronograph

  1. That Rolex is awesome! Goodness! While the brand is excellent and respected, I never expected to use the words “Rolex” and “Awesome” in the same sentence!

    Good wishes as you head for Las Vegas… may you return with heightened excitement after visiting the shows.

  2. This IS a bad boy. Are my eyes deceiving me or is this beauty incredibly slim for a split second chrono?

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